PUBLIC HEARING – TODAY, Thursday 9/29

September 29th, 2016 by caitlyn

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TODAY! CITY HALL ROOM 400 at NOON! WEAR YELLOW!

Now is the time to come out and show your support for all that we’ve been building together for the past 6.5 years.

The development proposal for 203 Cotter is being reviewed by the SF Planning Commission, and we need your presence at this hearing to send a strong message to the commissioners that this land is one of San Francisco’s last remaining farmable parcels, and locking up the gate and developing it for private use will be a huge loss of momentum for SF’s urban agriculture movement.

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What: A defense of cultivatable soil. A pledge toward the absolute necessity of working urban farms.

When: TODAY, Thursday 9/29 at noon (this item is last on the meeting agenda, so the meeting could very well last into the afternoon. Please do come at noon if you can — a strong showing at the outset of the meeting is crucial — but feel free to drop in later in the afternoon if that’s what you can swing. We’ll need a large presence throughout the afternoon).

Where: City Hall – Room 400

WEAR YELLOW!

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Details:

The proposed private school will house 200 students, plus faculty, on this narrow property surrounded by bedroom windows. It will shift this site from a publicly accessible working farm, a valuable site of learning for city residents and a crucial incubator site for aspiring farmers, to a gated multi-building school campus with garden space.

The City of San Francisco has shown great strides in its support for urban agriculture (see some of the City’s legislative support here), and now we need the Planning Commission to continue this momentum. San Francisco wants farmable space; WE NEED FARMS.

See you at City Hall!

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“SAVE THE FARM – Mission Terrace Neighbors support Little City Gardens” — signs on houses throughout the Mission Terrace neighborhood since 2014.

the future of this land

September 11th, 2016 by caitlyn

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EDITED TO NOTE: We encourage you to send a letter to the Planning Commission voicing your concern over the potential loss of this farmable land! Letters can be sent to Nancy.H.Tran@sfgov.org (please reference case # 2015-003791CUA​) by September 19th.

On September 29th, the SF Planning Commission will review Golden Bridges School’s proposal to change the zoning and develop 203 Cotter, the land that Little City Gardens transformed and has farmed since 2010. In this proposal, the property’s use would be changed from its current RH-1 (single dwelling housing) or Neighborhood Agricultural (farm use) to a multiple-building school campus aiming to accommodate 200 students plus faculty for a K-8 school. After much careful, heartfelt consideration, and after two years of not being able to truthfully speak my feelings about this development, I’ve decided I can’t let this process move forward without publicly voicing my position.

As the steward of this land for the past 6.5 years, as a staunch advocate for the importance of farming in the city, and as an active, engaged SF resident, I cannot in good conscience support a project that builds on top of one of our city’s last remaining unbuilt parcels. My relationship with this soil is too profound, and my history of work around its activation and preservation is too significant to be silent about what I believe to be the best use of this land. I care deeply, and I feel very strongly that an open, productive, working farm, with its proven educational value and community benefit, is the best use of this unique space that is in many ways ill-suited for development. To change this parcel’s use, and to pave over any bit of this soil would be a huge loss of momentum for San Francisco and for the wider urban agriculture movement.

To be clear, Golden Bridges’ proposal does not come as a surprise to me, as I’ve been aware of their hopes to eventually develop the property into a private school campus since they announced their first designs in late 2014, and I’ve been witness to the evolution of their visions since then. I signed a Letter of Non-Opposition as a condition of our land use agreement last year, and I’ve not publicly voiced my opinion about their proposed plans (though I’ve made my thoughts clear to Golden Bridges founders since 2014), no matter how stifling this silence has felt given the importance of dialogue to this farm project. But it is out of a strong sense of responsibility to this soil, and to the incredible community who has tended it, that I must voice my opposition.

Ultimately, my need to speak is not about Golden Bridges as a group of people; there are lovely people in this community with well intended visions. This is about their proposed development and use — a 200+ person private school, with multi-story buildings — the inappropriateness of this plan on this particular piece of land, and the significance of the loss that San Francisco would suffer if this development happens.

I fully recognize Golden Bridges’ rights as property owners to pursue their visions and move through the appropriate public process required to change the zoning that they knew was in place when they purchased the land. After careful consideration I’ve determined that, as an invested community member, I can’t pass up my right to participate in this public process as well.

Some background:

Over the past year I’ve stayed silent as I’ve read mischaracterizations of Little City Gardens by the wider Golden Bridges community when defending their proposed displacement of the farm (that this was never a viable endeavor anyway, that we were always a temporary “pop-up” farm, that we’ve been merely riding the wave of generosity offered by previous property owners). These narratives, however, diminish our hard work over the past six years to identify and spotlight the barriers to an urban farm’s viability, and our extensive advocacy for policy that would eventually make this viability possible, for ourselves and for others.

In 2011, our farm was the City’s preeminent example that drove the passing of the Urban Agriculture Zoning Ordinance, updating SF’s zoning code to allow for more urban farming in the city. This legislation was directly instigated by our farm at this site, was supported widely by organizations, businesses and residents throughout the city (as evident by a packed hearing room that overflowed into the hallway of City Hall!) and it was signed into law by Mayor Lee at a historical and well attended ceremony on the farm.

In 2013, after identifying land tenure as a crucial component to the sustainability of urban agriculture, we catalyzed and helped to pass AB551, statewide legislation that incentivizes vacant property owners to enter into longer-term contracts with urban farmers. This law empowers farmers with the stability and security absolutely essential for viability, and its inception came directly out of conversations about the uniqueness of this very site and the momentum our farm had built.

When Golden Bridges purchased this property very quickly in 2014, I was actively pursuing acquisition scenarios that would support our need for land security. I was in conversation, with the support of an incredible team of advisors and advocates, with a land trust and with the PUC, and we were also brainstorming interim ownership opportunities should these relationship possibilities not come to fruition quickly enough. We articulated visions for public / private partnership, researched educational / commercial hybrid farm models, and utilized data and observations from our first three years of work onsite to establish sound financial projections and solicit support for the continuation of this work. Obviously we didn’t get far enough to pull together a buyer in time, as Golden Bridges found and closed on the property very quickly. There was talk of collaboration early on, or at least the carrying on of Little City Gardens’ visions of 203 Cotter remaining a farm in perpetuity, which had me feeling disappointed about having our acquisition work interrupted, but optimistic that our visions may be aligned. But the school’s designs evolved, and it become quickly evident that there was no place for Little City Gardens in these visions, and no farm at all for that matter.

After over a year of a vagueness, we negotiated a contract in June 2015, outlining a shared arrangement where Little City would continue its work onsite, maintaining the front part of the property as a farm while Golden Bridges pursued its permitting and used the back of the property as an outdoor classroom. Golden Bridges contributed a monthly stipend toward shared expenses (the water bill, for one), as they would be increasingly using the site. I’ve always maintained my desire to farm this land, and continue our work, for as long as possible.

My position:

I truly feel that the scope of Golden Bridges’ plans — a K-8 school — though rooted in value systems and philosophies I admire and can relate to, is inappropriate for this space. I also believe that the traffic flow, density, noise and sewer capacity concerns that the neighbors raise are real and valid (see SaveTheFarmSF.com — our neighbors’ passionate support of permanent farm use for this space). I acknowledge the school’s efforts over the past year to rework its plans and reshape its presentation in order to appease worries and garner support, but I can’t help seeing the proposed use for this particular site, no matter its packaging, as hammering a square peg into a round hole. It is heartbreaking, too big for this narrow lot surrounded on three sides by bedroom windows, and too negatively impactful for the neighborhood. It doesn’t make sense. Despite the carefully constructed description as “the nation’s first urban farm school” (a claim which inaccurately erases much of the farm & garden education work already happening in our public schools right here in SF, see here, here and here), the proposed project is an ambitiously dense private school campus with play area and gardening space. It is not a farm and it is not a preservation of this land.

And, a more personal note:

My relationship to this particular piece of land, after 6.5 years, is profound. When I walk the length of the farm, my feet know every subtle rise and dip of the path. I know which patches of earth are particularly sandy, and which are still heavy with clay. I know where the wild onions will come up the strongest after our first rain, and I know where the bluejays usually land in the mornings to survey the scene. I know the path that the red-tailed hawk flies when she’s in the neighborhood. I understand where the water flows and pools during the wet winter season, and exactly where the shadows fall as the sun gets higher in the summer and lower again in the winter. Cycles repeat year after year, and I know them like the back of my hand. I know this land like it’s a friend.

I know the stories of this property from our neighbors who grew up playing on it, and from neighbors who gardened small patches of it when it was a tangle of weeds. I’ve welcomed new neighbors with flower bouquets, and I said tearful goodbyes to a close neighbor and friend who passed away. I listen to George’s longwinded stories every time he stops in on his way to feed the ducks at McClaren Park, and I give garden scraps to Sabrina for her chickens while she tells us stories about growing up on a farm in Italy. I know our neighbor Mark doesn’t like cilantro, and Bob loves chard. I’ve formed relationships with my neighbors, and some are now my family.

I’ve also gotten to witness the relationships between this land and many of the others who have helped tend to it, volunteering their time and labor in exchange for food, flowers and hands on learning. I’ve watched close friendships form over bed turning, and I’ve heard heavy life stories be talked out over transplanting. I’ve seen identities solidify as people develop and sharpen their skills as farmers in the city.

In this time we here at Little City have personally grown as farmers. We are collecting valuable data around the production, sales, and labor required for an urban farm of this size. We continue to draw, and add to, answers to our original questions. Can a farm be commercially viable in San Francisco? Yes. If so, what supports or conditions are required? Long term tenure, and land dedicated permanently for farming. What are the benefits to having a working farm in the city? It teaches us all that the potential of our food system rests in our hands.

I’m incredibly grateful to be stewarding this land, and grateful to be able to voice my feelings about its future. I will continue to speak for it and take care of it, holding the gate open, for as long as I am able. My position ultimately is not about me, or Golden Bridges, but about a zoning change and process of development on this land that, once started, cannot be undone.

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If you would like to voice your concerns about this proposed development, please email Nancy.H.Tran@sfgov.org (referencing CASE #: 2015-003791CUA​) no later than September 19th.

More info and background about Little City Gardens’ visions and history can be found in our FAQ.

2016 flower apprenticeship

June 20th, 2016 by caitlyn

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Flower season is here again at Little City Gardens, and we’re looking for a 2016 flower apprentice!

After last year’s move toward more significant flower production, we’re continuing to hone our flower growing and bouquet making skills. We’ve expanded our dahlia patch and increased the amount of bed space devoted to other summer blooms. We’re growing some of our favorite flowers from the past couple of seasons, and we’re experimenting with a few new varieties and textures. We’re building on last year’s lessons and momentum, working with old customers and new, and we’re approaching this summer with efficiency and artistry in mind. We’d love some help working with these beauties, and we’d love to share with you some of what we’ve learned so far.

What we can offer:

  • In-depth explanation of our methods of flower production as we’ve developed them, from soil care, to plant spacing, to crop maintenance
  • Harvest practices and tips
  • Bouquet making basics
  • Continual conversation about the ins and outs of running a small urban farm business, observations about sales outlets, customer relationships and pricing
  • Weekly flowers & veggies to take home
  • Your weekly horoscope

Ideal interns will be:

  • Organized and thorough
  • Excited to learn about flower growing
  • Have a good eye for color and texture
  • Invigorated by ambitious, focused work and willing to get dirty
  • Able to get up early and spend mornings outside
  • Available Wednesday mornings 7am-noon, mid July – end of September

Internship tasks:

  • Harvest, trim and sort flowers
  • Help with bouquet making and wrapping
  • Help with cleanup (bucket washing, pruner care)
  • Occasional crop maintenance (weeding, deadheading, fertilizing, etc)

TO APPLY:

Please send an email to littlecitygardens@gmail.com (subject FLOWER APPRENTICESHIP) responding briefly to the following questions. Deadline for applications is Monday June 27th. Applicants will ideally be available for 2-3 hours on Weds July 6th or Thursday July 7th to join us for a working interview on the farm.

    • Describe your interest (and/or experience — though none is required) in farming or working with flowers.
    • What skills do you bring?
    • What’s most compelling to you about farming in the city? Why is it important?
    • Are you available on Wednesday mornings July – Sept? (Please mention any out of town plans).
    • How long have you lived in SF? What other kinds of things do you like to do?

We can’t wait to hear from you!

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PLANT SALE! Saturday May 14th

April 27th, 2016 by caitlyn

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PLANT SALE & SPRING FAIRE!
Saturday May 14th
11-5pm
at the farm, 203 Cotter St**

This spring we’ve been nurturing seedlings for your own summer garden. Come load up on plants, tour the farm, learn some great gardening tips, listen to music and enjoy some sunshine!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Scheduled activities:

FARM TOUR – 12pm & 3pm
Have you still never seen one of SF’s most beautiful acres? Join Caitlyn for a brief 20 minute farm tour, with Q & A focusing on tips and techniques for your own garden!

LIVE FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS – All Day
Juna Alinea, one of our 2015 summer flower apprentices and a very talented florist, will be back with her van / mobile floral studio, offering stunning spring arrangements

LIVE WATERCOLOR PORTRAITS – All Day
Back by popular demand! Get your portrait painted by Joe Ferriso!

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Also with SPECIAL GUESTS:

The Garden for the Environment: learn all about worm composting, and get info about workshop and gardening opportunities out at this incredible garden in the Sunset. The GFE is an indispensable gardening resource here in the city

Fog City Gardener: another local grower joining us with varieties of tomatoes conducive to SF’s unique summer climate

1849 Medicine Garden: learn more about herbal medicine made from plants grown right here in SF

Churn Creamery: small-batch ice cream, featuring a some ingredients from the farm

Beekeepers: Join one of our resident beekeepers, Diana, for beekeeping info and some honey-related goods

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

See you there!

**Parking: please note parking is limited in this residential area, so arrival by bicycle, MUNI (J-train to Santa Rosa Ave), BUS (14 to Silver Ave) or BART (Glen Park) is strongly encouraged when possible. Please respect our neighbors by not blocking driveways.

**Accessibility: the farm path from the front gate to the main faire area is unpaved, with patchy grass and dirt. If you need wheelchair assistance, or have any questions about accessibility, please email littlecitygardens@gmail.com.

**Restrooms: There is no restroom onsite. The nearest facilities are at the Excelsior Public Library two blocks away (Mission & Cotter) — open 10am-6pm.

spring update

March 22nd, 2016 by caitlyn

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Many of you have been asking about the status of our lease now that Golden Bridges School, the new property owners, are moving forward with the permitting process required to build their campus onsite. While in January we were heartbroken to announce an imminent lease termination date, we are very relieved to be in conversation about a possible extension to this timeline.

While the conversation is ongoing, and the situation is complicated, the season’s clock is ticking away. Seeds must be sown now or never, if we are to make the best of this season, so we’re forging ahead as best we can. Most of the dahlias are in the ground and many seeds are sown in the greenhouse, and our hopes are high that we’ll be able to see this spring work bear fruit (or flowers, rather!) later this season. Each bed turned and prepped feels like a gesture of hope.

We’re still delivering weekly to restaurants, mostly from our fall-planted beds of green garlic, beets, swiss chard, fava and pea greens, carrots, and herbs. We’re also putting together plans for our weekly CSA for May (sign up for our email list here if you’re interested in emails once boxes become available). And please note, we’re planning a very exciting farm event later this Spring, to be announced soon…!

Make sure you’re following our daily photos here so you can see how lush everything is after all this recent rain! And thank you all sincerely for your words of support and encouragement, we definitely never feel alone out there at the farm.

2nd ANNUAL WINTER FAIRE

November 24th, 2015 by caitlyn

Please join us at the farm for our 2nd Annual Winter Faire & Holiday Market!

SATURDAY DECEMBER 12th
10am – 4pm
at the farm, 203 Cotter St in the Outer Mission**

The scene:
Once again, we’ll have a crackling fire in the chiminea and lights strung about, hot soup and hot beverages. There will be scheduled farm tours and herb walks, kids’ activities, a puppet show, and music. The paths will be mowed and tidy, and we’ll put our very last flowers in vases for you. You can peruse tables filled with top notch Bay Area goods, perfect for all your holiday gift giving, and then sit on blankets by the fire in the low December light, enjoying some music and hot refreshments. It’s been another long, focused season at the farm, and we are very excited to open up the gate, sip some hot tea with you, and mark the end of 2015.

The goods:
The faire will be a one stop shop for really incredible gifts! We’ll have Little City goods — more tote bags (back by popular demand!), a fresh made batch of herbal remedies, seeds we’ve saved this year, and some farm drawings and dried flower artwork made by some of our nearest and dearest farm regulars. There will also be an impressive array of herbal medicine makers, beekeepers, jewelers, woodworkers, ceramicists, knitters, painters, florists, and cheesemakers offering their wares!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Scheduled activities:

FARM TOUR – 11am & 2pm
Want to roam the farm and check out the crops? Curious about what we do, our history, and what we have in store for the coming season? Join Caitlyn for a brief 20 minute farm tour, with Q & A!

HERB WALK – 3pm
Bonnie Weaver, an herbalist and long time Little City Gardens volunteer, will lead a short walk through the farm, identifying common medicinal weeds and highlighting their benefits and uses. This is also a great chance to learn about the plants that have gone into our Little City Gardens herbal salve, hand cream, and herbal mist — available once again at the faire.

PUPPET SHOW – 11:30am & 12:30pm
Preschool and Kindergarden teachers from Golden Bridges School will present a hand puppet show!

LIVE FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS – All Day
Juna Alinea, one of our summer flower apprentices and a very talented florist, will be parking her converted van / floral studio onsite and making stunning arrangements on demand

LIVE WATERCOLOR PORTRAITS – All Day
Get your portrait painted by Joe Ferriso!

RAFFLE! – all day
Enter for your chance to win dinner for two (or equivalent) to one of the fine restaurants we work with — Outerlands, Californios, Kronnerburger or Tartine Bakery! Winning names will be drawn at the end of the day.

Please join us for a fantastic time on one of the most beautiful acres in the city! We’d love to see you!

**Parking: please note parking is limited in this residential area, so arrival by bicycle, MUNI (J-train to Santa Rosa Ave) or BART (Glen Park) is strongly encouraged when possible. Please respect our neighbors by not blocking driveways.

**Accessibility: the farm path from the front gate to the main faire area is unpaved, with patchy grass and dirt. If you need wheelchair assistance, or have any questions about accessibility, please email littlecitygardens@gmail.com.

**Restrooms: There is no restroom onsite. The nearest facilities are at the Excelsior Public Library two blocks away (Mission & Cotter) — open 10am-6pm.

thanksgiving

November 17th, 2015 by caitlyn

We’re now accepting preorders for Thanksgiving boxes!

Boxes will include our lovingly crafted salad mix*, along with a selection of other veggies and herbs from the farm. We’ve been working hard these past few months to diligently plan out, seed, weed, cover, and tend to these crops in perfect time for your holiday feasts.

* If you’re new to the Little City Gardens salad mix, here’s what to expect: a diverse, wildcrafted blend including a dozen different varieties of tender greens, herbs, and edible flowers. It is a unique, lovingly crafted mix that is as flavorful as it is beautiful. Just dress it lightly with olive oil and salt and you have an impressive ready-made side dish to feed your family and friends. It’s long been our most popular item, and sells out quickly!

Below is what we have available for Thanksgiving, by pre-order only. Availability is limited, and first come first serve, so please do get your orders in as soon as possible! We’ll confirm your order and provide additional pickup details by email.

THANKSGIVING FARM BOX (special price): $25
salad mix (1/2 lb bag)*
1.5 lb sunchokes (incredibly delicious root crop, highly recommended!)
1 bunch greens (lacinato kale or collard greens)
1 bunch turnips (salad turnips, great fresh or lightly cooked0
1 bunch mixed herbs (bundle of thyme, rosemary, marjoram, sage etc)

Individual items (as add-ons to the farm box only):
sunchokes — $4.50/lb
lacinato kale — $2.50/bu
rainbow chard — $2.50/bu
mixed herb bundles — $5/bu
turnips — $3.50/bu

Please email orders in no later than Sunday 11/22 at 9pm — littlecitygardens@gmail.com, subject THANKSGIVING ORDER.

Pickup is Wednesday 11/25, 4-5:30pm — at the farm (203 Cotter St).

Thank you for your support, and for putting our city-grown veggies on your holiday tables!

summer & fall

November 10th, 2015 by caitlyn

We’re still in the thick of the season over here, filling weekly orders of vegetables, herbs and cut flowers for restaurants and wholesale accounts. The flower season has lasted much longer than I anticipated, which is satisfying and helpful. Usually our predictions are more ambitious than actual yields, not the other way around!

We’re saving seeds, tending to our young fall crops, planning for winter, getting ready for Fall CSA orders, and getting beds turned and cover crop sown.

Please stay tuned for more info about ordering salad mix for Thanksgiving, our second annual Winter Faire at the farm (Sat December 12th, mark your calendars, it’s going to be a good one!!), Little City herbal products, and reflections on our sixth season. (And, in the meantime, head over to instagram!).

poetry at the farm

October 1st, 2015 by caitlyn

Please join us at the farm for an outdoor poetry reading at dusk. The dahlias will still be blooming their last blooms, the air will smell like fennel, and the fireplace will be ablaze.

readings by:
Jackson Meazle
Rod Roland
Micah Ballard

Saturday October 10th – 6pm

Bring a blanket to sit on and a mug to drink out of.

See you there!

flower internship

June 21st, 2015 by caitlyn

Little City Gardens is looking for a summer flower intern!

For the past two seasons, we’ve been increasing our flower production here at the farm, especially in the summer months. Cut flowers contribute to the farm’s financial stability and feel like an important addition to the conversation about how urban farming can fit into a local marketplace. Plus, after years of growing primarily greens, herbs, and cool season veggies (which we still grow), we take total delight in watching the farm explode in colors and textures! The dahlia’s fiery colors warm up San Francisco’s foggy gray days.

This 2015 season, our flower production is increasing significantly. We’ve spent the spring seeding, transplanting and tending to thousands of young plants, and as we watch them grow closer to bloom time, we are gearing up for a very busy summer of flower harvesting and bouquet making.

We’d love some help in this experiment, and we’d love to share with you some of what we’ve learned so far! Do you have some free time this summer? Do you want to learn more about small-scale farming, flower growing, and bouquet making? Want to spend time on one of the most beautiful acres in the city?

What we can offer:

  • In-depth explanation of our methods of flower production as we’ve developed them, from soil care, to plant spacing, to crop maintenance
  • Harvest practices and tips
  • Bouquet making basics
  • Continual conversation about the ins and outs of running a small urban farm business, observations about sales outlets, customer relationships and pricing
  • Weekly flowers & veggies to take home
  • Chocolate at lunch, pretty much always

Ideal interns will be:

  • Organized and thorough
  • Excited to learn about flower growing
  • Have a good eye for color and texture
  • Invigorated by hard work and willing to get dirty
  • Able to get up early and spend mornings outside
  • Available one consistent day per week (TBD, likely Weds) mid July – Sept (approx 8 weeks)

Internship tasks:

  • Harvest, trim and sort flowers
  • Help with bouquet making and wrapping
  • Help with cleanup (bucket washing, pruner care)
  • Occasional crop maintenance (weeding, deadheading, fertilizing, etc)

TO APPLY:

Please send an email to littlecitygardens at gmail (subject FLOWER INTERNSHIP) responding briefly to the following questions. Deadline for applications is Monday June 29th. Applicants will ideally be available for 2-3 hours on Weds July 1st or Weds July 8th for a working introduction / interview on the farm.

  • Describe your interest (and/or experience — though none is required) in farming or working with flowers.
  • What skills do you bring?
  • What’s most compelling to you about farming in the city? Why is it important?
  • Are you available on Wednesday mornings July – Sept? If not, what days are you most available? (Please also mention any out of town plans).
  • How long have you lived in SF? What other kinds of things do you like to do?
  • We can’t wait to hear from you!

salad & flowers this week!

April 2nd, 2015 by caitlyn

Hello everyone — we have a few shares of salad & flowers left for pickup this Friday! Please see below for a description of this week’s box (and how to order), and further below for a description of our weekly CSA plans for the spring season.

GET YOUR SALAD & VEGGIES FOR THIS WEEKEND!

Do you need flowers to dress up your brunch table this weekend? Or want to treat yourself to the tastiest salad mix around? Or feel compelled to support one of your favorite urban farms? Get your orders in! We look forward to feeding you!

This week’s box ($20):
salad mix (1/2 pound bag)*
beautiful wild spring flower bouquet

Additional items available:
extra salad mix ($10/bag)
mixed herb bundles ($4/bunch)
bunching onions ($3/bunch)
spearmint ($2/bunch)

Pickup this week will be FRIDAY 4/3 from 4-5:30 at the farm (203 Cotter St).

To order, just send a quick email to littlecitygardens@gmail.com (subject: SALAD & FLOWERS) specifying how many boxes you’d like (and how many extras). We’ll send an email back to confirm your order.

Please order by the end of the day Thursday 4/2. Orders will be filled first come first served.

* Our salad mix is a carefully crafted blend of over 25 different tender greens, herbs, and edible flowers, and the makeup of the mix changes with the season. Featured in the mix this spring: miner’s lettuce, edible chrysanthemum, spicy mustards, and tangy sorrel. It’s slightly different each week, but it’s always a crowd pleaser. Dress lightly with olive oil, lemon juice and salt.

Salad testimonials:

“Your salad was mind blowing! I’m still reveling in its complexity. Thanks for the advice to just add a little olive oil and salt!”

“The salad was the hit of our dinner, with everyone so curious about all the different shapes and colors.”

“Your salad mix is A-MAZE-ING.”

“Your salad mix is soooo addictive!!!!”

“My picky eight year old son can’t get enough of your salad mix — he asks for more.”

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Spring CSA plans:

We’ve spent some time in the past few weeks weighing options (and chatting with some of you!) about how best to approach a CSA program this spring. Ultimately we’ve decided to continue on with the week-by-week program that’s already in place and is working well. While a committed membership for a set amount of time has its benefits (upfront payment in a lean time of year, consistency, familiarity, and streamlined communication), we are also excited to remain as accessible as possible to you, our community of customers. It’s important to us that you are able to join in and support the farm when you can, and to feel able to skip a week without hassle when you need to. It’s also helpful for us to be able to maintain flexibility in our availability, not needing to fret if we are offering the same box two weeks in a row.

So what does this mean? For the duration of the spring, sign up for our email list, and watch out for our weekly emails! We’ve timed and coordinated a steady stream of salad, veggies and flowers (in different combination) for the rest of the spring, and we’ll continue to take email orders, first come first served, as we’ve been doing. The pickup day/time may occasionally vary from week to week, allowing more of you to participate throughout the season.

We are excited to continue connecting with you all, and we look forward to nourishing you with farm fresh goods.